StyleKemistry meets the Samurai

The Samurai (Era:1185-1868) was the highest ranking social caste during its time. It would have been quite amazing to live in this era and see these warriors in action (I know, I know, it would have been almost impossible to do that, but I can imagine).

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In 1185, Japan began to be governed by the Samurai. Up until this time the government was aristocratic where people held certain positions because they were born to families entitled to hold those jobs. This should be sounding very familiar…

The #Samurai’s main weapon was the sword and today our main weapon of choice are words…(hmmm I just switch the letter “s” around and have always thought about this). I love to play with words…

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Back to 1600, one of the most powerful military families, the Tokugawa, was able to gain military control over all the local daimyô. They followed a strict moral code that governed their entire life. The Tokugawa created a much stronger military government in Edo, this you now know as Tôkyô. They controlled all elements of society!

The term “Samurai” is strictly masculine. The Japanese bushi class (the social class that the samurai came from) did feature women who received similar training in martial arts and strategy. These women were called “Onna-Bugeisha,” and they were allowed to participate in combat alongside the men. Her weapon of choice was usually the naginata, a spear with a curved, sword-like blade that was versatile, yet relatively light.

Although, there were women, the exhibition did not highlight any of them. So, I became obsessed with the headdress worn by them and the history, since I only learned the bare minimum about the Samurai women. A little disappointing…

The head pieces are known as the Kabuto and constructed with these metal plates riveted together. Fascinating…they were secured to the head by a chin cord called shinobi-no-o, and tied under the chin. Well I don’t know who did this, the museum or if this was traditional but all the cords where tied in a “noose” (see the pictures above). I truly did feel some type of way about this, but…

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IMG_3445IMG_3444IMG_3434IMG_3425IMG_3424Samurai: Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection was an excellent exhibition…

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